THEME

mooreaseal:

California succulents. We’re in So Cal for a dear friend’s wedding this weekend! (at Ventura, California)

mooreaseal:

California succulents. We’re in So Cal for a dear friend’s wedding this weekend! (at Ventura, California)

(Source: weheartit.com)

(Source: kuroii-chu)

(Source: beatpie)

rhamphotheca:

STORIES I CANT STOP POSTING ABOUT:
If A Fish Grows Up On Land, Will It Learn To Walk?
Flipping your fins actually does get you pretty far.
by Lauren Grush
The old idiom about “being a fish out of water” just lost some of its luster. Researchers from McGill University in Canada successfully trained a group of fish to live on land and strut around.
The idea was to simulate what might have happened 400 million years ago, when the first group of ancient fish moved from water to land, eventually evolving into the amphibians, reptiles, birds and other animals roaming the Earth today. The researchers wanted to see if their land-dwelling fish looked and behaved similarly to the ancient fish, based on what has been learned about them from fossil records.
For their experiment, the research team raised 111 juvenile Polypterus senegalus – African fish also known as the “dinosaur eel” — on land. These fish already look a lot like the ancient fish that evolved millions of years ago, and they’re already capable of “walking” with their fins and breathing air.  According to the Verge, their terrestrial environment had mesh flooring covered in pebbles, as well as 3 millimeters of water, so the fish didn’t dry out completely…
(read more/ watch video: Popular Science)
photo: NATURE

rhamphotheca:

STORIES I CANT STOP POSTING ABOUT:

If A Fish Grows Up On Land, Will It Learn To Walk?

Flipping your fins actually does get you pretty far.

by Lauren Grush

The old idiom about “being a fish out of water” just lost some of its luster. Researchers from McGill University in Canada successfully trained a group of fish to live on land and strut around.

The idea was to simulate what might have happened 400 million years ago, when the first group of ancient fish moved from water to land, eventually evolving into the amphibians, reptiles, birds and other animals roaming the Earth today. The researchers wanted to see if their land-dwelling fish looked and behaved similarly to the ancient fish, based on what has been learned about them from fossil records.

For their experiment, the research team raised 111 juvenile Polypterus senegalus – African fish also known as the “dinosaur eel” — on land. These fish already look a lot like the ancient fish that evolved millions of years ago, and they’re already capable of “walking” with their fins and breathing air.  According to the Verge, their terrestrial environment had mesh flooring covered in pebbles, as well as 3 millimeters of water, so the fish didn’t dry out completely…

(read more/ watch video: Popular Science)

photo: NATURE

clipture:

野宮神社 by yuwy* on Flickr.

clipture:

野宮神社 by yuwy* on Flickr.

(Source: natebynight)

lcyungsoos:

view from the pedestrian overpass (by shoegahsu)

lcyungsoos:

view from the pedestrian overpass (by shoegahsu)

emirra:

I think they made her more than proud.

emirra:

I think they made her more than proud.

(Source: zoiodlula)

brutalgeneration:

Maison des vacances. (by Alejandro Melero Carrillo)

brutalgeneration:

Maison des vacances. (by Alejandro Melero Carrillo)

kenketsu:

█║▌│█│║▌║││█║▌║▌║hata_hata

kenketsu:

█║▌│█│║▌║││█║▌║▌║hata_hata

azabocheni-mindiko:

adorus:

(by Robin Mellway)


*

azabocheni-mindiko:

adorus:

(by Robin Mellway)

*